Tag Archives: Netflix

Adobe Joins the Netflix Post Technology Alliance



Netflix announced the Netflix Post Technology Alliance. It is a program for manufacturers of products that generate or manage any kind of sound data, image data, or metadata from production through post. Any product that meets this criterion is a candidate for the Netflix Post Technology Alliance logo.

As an artist, it’s important that your needs drive the technical innovation in the tools you use. The Netflix Post Technology Alliance will act as a conduit for Netflix to support creatives and technology partners on new feature sets for tools, so artists can spend their creative energy on what matters most – the storytelling.

Adobe announced that they are excited that Adobe will be joining Netflix’s new Post Technology Alliance. Adobe Premier Pro CC and Adobe After Effects CC will receive a Post Technology Alliance product designation. Together, Adobe and Netflix will work hand-in-hand to solve the challenges currently faced by post-production professionals and push the boundaries of technology so creativity can flow freely.

The Netflix Post Technology Alliance includes the industry leaders in four categories: cameras, creative editorial, color grading, and IMF packaging, with products from Adobe, Arri, Avid, Blackmagic Design, Canon, Colorfront, Fraunhofer IIS, Filmlight, Marquise Technologies, MTI Film, Ownzones, Panasonic, Red Digital Cinema, Rohde & Schwarz, and Sony.

Netflix has launched a new logo program to help people identify the products that are partners. When you see the Netflix Post Technology Alliance logo, you’ll know the product meets Netflix’s technical and delivery specifications today, and will continue to do so in the future.


Netflix Now Using VP9 Codec on Some Devices



Netflix logoPopular video-streaming service Netflix made a significant change to how it works when it recently announced it’d allow users on mobile devices to download complete videos, instead of offering only streaming. It was a smart move on behalf of Netflix, as it gives mobile users the ability to download movies and TV shows on Wi-Fi and then consume those videos where they may have limited (or no) internet access.

And while that flexibility may solve one problem (access to Netflix content), it can create another; maxing out available storage. Modern mobile devices run the range from 8GB to 128GB of storage. And with modern devices doing more and more, internal storage exists at a premium. The new offline mode provided by Netflix wouldn’t get much use if it filled up users’ devices after one or two sessions. With this in mind, Netflix had to devise a way for those downloaded files to use as little space as possible:

One of the biggest differences between shows you download and shows you stream on Netflix is the video format, or codec, the company is using. For streaming, Netflix has been using H.264/AVC almost exclusively. However, users who download Netflix shows to most Android devices instead receive content encoded with VP9 — an open source video codec developed by Google that uses a bunch of advanced encoding tricks to deliver the same video quality with significantly less data, or a better video qualities with the same amount of data.

As VP9 is a Google-developed codec, it’s not currently supported by Apple. For now, Netflix is using a slightly modified version of H.264 on iOS devices. Apple hasn’t yet indicated if it will support VP9 in the future.